Windpower

Correlated Magnetics Polymagnet Catalog now available through Amazing Magnets

March 5, 2014 (Anaheim, Calif.) – Correlated Magnetics Research (CMR) and Amazing Magnets LLC announce the formation of a retail partnership for online access to CMR’s Polymagnet® catalog. Amazing Magnets can quickly deliver these advanced magnet products for prototyping and production because of their extensive stock of high-quality magnetic materials and new Polymagnet production capacity. Anaheim-based Amazing Magnets supports fast and economical production of standard and custom Polymagnet designs. Amazing Magnets’ website offers a large variety of licensed, neodymium rare-earth magnets as well as samarium cobalt and non-rare-earth permanent magnets. Through this partnership, the storefront is expanded to offer CMR’s Polymagnet Catalog. This adds high-performance magnet systems from CMR that make entirely new applications possible… Read more…
Windpower

Correlated Magnetics Research releases desktop magnetic printer for advanced magnetics assemblies

Jan. 28, 2014 (Huntsville, Ala.) – Correlated Magnetics Research (CMR) today announced the desktop version of its precision magnetizer that launched in December of last year. The Mini MagPrinter® is targeted toward product design and prototyping with customized magnets made possible by CMR’s new magnetics technology. The Mini MagPrinter system includes CMR’s Polymagnet Catalog® of pre-engineered magnetic functions, and the design software to customize magnet strength and behavior.
The Mini MagPrinter is a rapid-prototyping magnetization system that “prints” arrays of magnetic regions onto a single piece of magnetic material to produce a Polymagnet. A Polymagnet is a patterned magnet tailored to perform novel magnetic functions that designers can integrate into consumer and industrial products. Each Polymagnet is a system of smaller magnets – both north and…
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Windpower

CMR ships world’s first magnetic printer and software catalog of advanced magnetic functions

Dec 9, 2013 (Huntsville, Ala.) – Correlated Magnetics Research (CMR) today announced that it is shipping the first magnetizing printer for permanent magnet materials and the first software catalog of advanced magnetic functions. The CMR MagPrinter is a production magnetization system that “prints” arrays of magnets onto a single piece of magnetic material to produce a Polymagnet – a patterned magnet tailored to perform novel magnetic functions. The MagPrinter software comes with the CMR Polymagnet Catalog that contains hundreds of magnet functions that designers can integrate into consumer and industrial products. Polymagnets are a new type of integrated magnetic system that deliver stronger local forces and exhibit unique behaviors such as precision auto-alignment, high torque transfer and even magnetic effects that reverse forces based on separation distance. Rather than one north pole and…Read more…
Windpower

Windpower: Can custom shaped magnetic fields improve wind-turbine generators?

Correlated Magnetics Research has developed a method of fully magnetizing small areas on magnetic materials and arranging these magnetic elements, or ‘maxels’ as the company calls them, into patterns so that the resulting magnetic device is tailored to a particular task. For instance, magnets can be programmed to attach in a particular orientation, or only to other magnets similarly coded. A designer might use these coded magnets to enable the assembly of structures without mechanical fasteners and only in the way the designer intended. The process essentially delivers custom magnetic fields of almost any shape and intensity. The maxels currently can range from 0.5 to 8-mm diameters. A programmed magnet may have as few as three and up to many thousands of maxels.
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New Hope

New Hope-based Correlated Magnetics Research’s ‘amazing and slightly spooky’ magnets get attention (video)

NEW HOPE, Alabama ‘ In only five years, New Hope-based Correlated Magnetics Research, which creates programmable magnets, has acquired 79 patents for an innovative product that can change “polarity and strength on a whim.”

The magnets got international exposure recently on TechCrunch’s website, which draws more than 12 million unique visitors and 37 million page views each month. East Coast Editor John Biggs, who has written for The New York Times, USA Weekend, Popular Mechanics, Popular Science, Money and other media, featured CMR’s magnets on TechCrunch’s gadgets site earlier this month.
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Alabama

Alabama-Based CMR Demos Programmable Magnets That Changes Polarity And Strength On A Whim

Magnets are pretty basic ‘ some poles attract, some repel, and you can use them to hold stuff up on your fridge. However, what happens when magnets can be ‘programmed’ to react in different ways? Huntsville, Ala.-based Correlated Magnetics Research has some magnets that can do some amazing ‘ and slightly spooky ‘ things.

These magnets can ‘hold together’ while still not touching, release from each other with a twist, and even act as a sort of magnetic motor. In one cool demo Stephen Straus, VP of CMR, shows us magnets that repel each other from a certain distance and then, when pushed close enough, snap together. Before you run away screaming ‘perpetual motion machine,’ understand that the laws of physics still apply.
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Capital Factory

POTUS Visit to the Capital Factory

(Community Matters) President Obama visited the Capital Factory today, an outstanding tech startup incubator co-founded & operated by several friends, especially Joshua Baer and Bill Boebel.

President Obama said he wanted to emphasize a focus on jobs, education and innovation. Prompted by a question by Ross about basic research, he asked us to speak up about the importance of government funded research for commercial innovation and job growth, acknowledging to the crowd that even billionaires were usually reluctant to fund the most basic.

With the President we watched demos of Lynx Labs by Chris Slaughter, Correlated Magnetics by Stephen Straus and Community Cars by Stacy Zoern.
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Magnetic Attraction

Magnetic Attraction

Magnets have a large number of commercial applications in a variety of devices, such as clutches, bearings, gears, fasteners, motors, sensors, security devices, pointers, scopes and optics, to name a few. The material in conventional high-field magnets is typically oriented, or magnetized, in a single direction, a condition that results in fields that are far from ideal for many electromechanical applications. Manufacturers of magnetic devices have been addressing this limitation by creating complex magnetization fixtures or by assembling groups of smaller magnets. Both of these methods increase fabrication challenges and result in field losses in the gaps between magnetic pieces.

The latest advancement in this field, correlated magnetics, involves precise and rapid magnetization of materials a small volume at a time, making it possible to optimize the emission of fields from magnetic materials ‘ and even to create field profiles that were not previously possible.
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